Food banks struggle to keep up with demand

Food banks struggle to keep up with demand

Food banks struggle to keep up with demand


The Freestore Foodbank in Cincinnati has been operating for 50 years.It now serves 20 counties in three states, but resources are being stretched thin.”Last week, during our food distribution in Norwood, we saw 75% of new people of the 1,100 that we saw. So we know that’s going to be a challenging demand for us to keep pace with,” said President/CEO Kurt Reiber.There’s a dramatic jump in need as stay at home orders shutter businesses and, in turn, cancel paychecks.While thousands wait for an overwhelmed unemployment system to kick in, they turn here. “The struggle is two-fold. It’s raising the money to be able to buy the food, but then it’s also making sure we can get the food in,” said Reiber.Just last week Reiber told Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley they gave out in one month what they typically give out in six months.And at that point, they had enough food to last about 4 weeks.”Which is pretty scary,” said Cranley.At a news conference Monday, Cranley urged everyone to fill out the Census, which would provide more federal funding for SNAP benefits.”If you think about the 10 meals that someone gets, 9 of those meals are attributed to SNAP benefits,” said Reiber.Reiber said former volunteers are now in need of help themselves.”The little girl asked her dad, ‘Are we here to volunteer?’ And he said, ‘No. We’ve made a lot of deposits to the foodbank over time in terms of time, treasure and talents and today we’re gonna make a withdrawal,'” said Reiber.The foodbank is a glimmer of hope for families struggling to keep their heads above water. “We are determined to have enough food and we will not disappoint this entire community,” said Reiber.Reiber added that people have really stepped up by hosting virtual food drives to raise money.Bengals player Sam Hubbard raised $9,400, he wears number 94.

The Freestore Foodbank in Cincinnati has been operating for 50 years.

It now serves 20 counties in three states, but resources are being stretched thin.

“Last week, during our food distribution in Norwood, we saw 75% of new people of the 1,100 that we saw. So we know that’s going to be a challenging demand for us to keep pace with,” said President/CEO Kurt Reiber.

There’s a dramatic jump in need as stay at home orders shutter businesses and, in turn, cancel paychecks.

While thousands wait for an overwhelmed unemployment system to kick in, they turn here.

“The struggle is two-fold. It’s raising the money to be able to buy the food, but then it’s also making sure we can get the food in,” said Reiber.

Just last week Reiber told Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley they gave out in one month what they typically give out in six months.

And at that point, they had enough food to last about 4 weeks.

“Which is pretty scary,” said Cranley.

At a news conference Monday, Cranley urged everyone to fill out the Census, which would provide more federal funding for SNAP benefits.

“If you think about the 10 meals that someone gets, 9 of those meals are attributed to SNAP benefits,” said Reiber.

Reiber said former volunteers are now in need of help themselves.

“The little girl asked her dad, ‘Are we here to volunteer?’ And he said, ‘No. We’ve made a lot of deposits to the foodbank over time in terms of time, treasure and talents and today we’re gonna make a withdrawal,'” said Reiber.

The foodbank is a glimmer of hope for families struggling to keep their heads above water.

“We are determined to have enough food and we will not disappoint this entire community,” said Reiber.

Reiber added that people have really stepped up by hosting virtual food drives to raise money.

Bengals player Sam Hubbard raised $9,400, he wears number 94.



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