Anger, sadness may signal poor health: Study

Anger, sadness may signal poor health: Study

Anger, sadness may signal poor health: Study


Anger, sadness may signal poor health: Study


Anger, sadness may signal poor health: Study&nbsp | &nbspPhoto Credit:&nbspThinkstock

Washington DC: Negative mood – such as sadness and anger – may be a signal of poor health, a study claims. Researchers from Pennsylvania State University in the US found that negative mood measured multiple times a day over time is associated with higher levels of inflammatory biomarkers. This extends prior research showing that clinical depression and hostility are associated with higher inflammation.

Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response to such things as infections, wounds, and damage to tissues. Chronic inflammation can contribute to numerous diseases and conditions, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes and some cancers.

The study, which was published in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, is the first examination of associations between both momentary and recalled measures of mood or affect with measures of inflammation, said Jennifer Graham-Engeland, an associate professor at Penn State.

Participants were asked to recall their feelings over a period of time in addition to reporting how they were feeling in the moment, in daily life. These self-assessments were taken over a two-week period, then each was followed by a blood draw to measure markers that indicated inflammation.

The researchers found that negative mood accumulated from the week closer to the blood draw was associated with higher levels of inflammation. Additional analyses also suggested that the timing of mood measurement relative to the blood draw mattered, Graham-Engeland said.

Specifically, there were stronger trends of association between momentary negative affect and inflammation when negative mood was assessed closer in time to blood collection. The work is novel because researchers not only used questionnaires that asked participants to recall their feelings over a period of time, they also asked participants how they were feeling in the moment, Graham-Engeland said.

In addition, momentary positive mood from the same week was associated with lower levels of inflammation, but only among men in this study. 



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